Welcome to the online euro collection! For an explanation of the table, see the text beneath it. Quick coin select:

Countries Years Denominations Other
Country Started Total (to 2017) Expected 2018 Owned 2018 Year CountriesTotal Owned Cumulative Value Total (to 2017) Expected 2018Other
1 Andorra 2014 39 10 10 1999 5/54040 40 1c 367 27 At-a-glance
2 Austria 2002 130 8 8 2000 5/54040 80 2c 36727Designs
3 Belgium 1999 171 10 10 2001 6/64848 128 5c 364 27 Links
4 Cyprus 2008 84 8 8 2002 15/15160160 288 10c 364 27 Market value
5 Estonia 2011 28 10 10 2003 15/15149149 437 20c 365 27 Marks
6 Finland 1999 175 10 10 2004 15/15158158 595 50c 339 24 Rarity
7 France 1999 170 10 10 2005 15/15163163 758 1 365 27 Statistics
8 Germany 2002 705 45 45 2006 15/15164164 922 2 340 21 Totals
9 Greece 2002 152 10 10 2007 16/16175175 1097 2 CC 380 44 Variants
10 Ireland 2002 133 8 8 2008 17/18182182 1279 List of 2 CCs in order
11 Italy 2002 150 10 10 2009 19/19203203 1482 This year's 2 CC
12 Latvia 2014 32 10 10 2010 19/19186186 1668
Latest coin
13 Lithuania 2015 18 10 10 2011 20/20212212 1880
14 Luxembourg 2002 152 30 30 2012 20/20213213 2093
15 Malta 2008 90 12 12 2013 19/20211211 2304
16 Monaco 2001 93 3 3 2014 21/22 232232 2536
17 Netherlands 1999 176 8 8 2015 23/23 267267 2803
18 Portugal 2002 147 10 10 2016 23/23 242242 3045
19 San Marino 2002 146 10 10 2017 23/23 250250 3295
20 Slovakia 2009 82 9 9 2018 23/23 270 (expected)270 3565
21 Slovenia 2007 100 9 9 2019 23
22 Spain 1999 166 10 10
23 Vatican City 2002 153 10 10
All 3295 270 270 All 3295 3565 3565 All 1779.26 173.73

This website contains a complete collection of euro coins minted since 1999 that are legal tender across the eurozone, including variants. There are coins of eight denominations: 1 cent, 2 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 50 cents, 1 euro and 2 euros. Countries may mint coins of other denominations, but they are only legal tender in the country of issue and this collection does not include them.

The site has a photo of each coin that can be enlarged to reveal all its detail. If you want to go directly to a photo of a particular coin, use the drop-down boxes at the top and click 'Select'. To see several coins, use the table.

The links in the first column of the table above lead to pages with the coins for that country. Click on 'All' at the end of the column to see all the coins, sorted by country. The second column shows the earliest year that is shown on euro coins for that country. Although coins were not in use until 2002, some countries put an earlier year of minting on their coins. The third column shows how many different coins have been minted by each country until the end of 2017. The fourth column shows how many are expected this year and the fifth shows how many are in the online euro collection so far of those. Germany has the most because it has five mints and issues five versions of each coin. The totals include intentional variants but not accidental variants.

The links in the sixth column lead to pages with the coins for that year. Click on 'All' to see all the coins sorted by year. The seventh column shows the number of countries that minted coins in that year. The eighth column shows the total number of different coins minted that year and the ninth column shows how many are in the online euro collection. The tenth column shows the cumulative total up to and including the year in question.

The links in the eleventh column lead to pages with the coins of that denomination. '2' means ordinary 2 euro coins, and '2 CC' means 2 euro commemorative coins. Until 2012 each country could issue one 2 CC, although there could also be a common issue across the eurozone. Since 2012, each country has been able to issue two 2 CCs per year. For each 2 CC there is a link to the entry in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) that sets out what the coin is commemorating. Click on 'All' to see all the coins sorted by denomination. The twelfth column shows how many different coins of that denomination have been minted until the end of 2017, and the thirteenth column shows how many are expected this year. The second last entry shows all 2 CCs since 2004 in the order they were issued, and the last entry shows the planned and issued 2 commemorative coins for this year, given the special interest that these generate.

There are some miscellaneous links in the final column. 'At-a-glance' takes you to a single table that loads quickly with a link to each coin image, colour-coded by what coins were issued in any year. 'Designs' shows the different designs for the national side of the coins as they have changed over the years, with links to the OJEU pages that announce the change of design. 'Links' leads to links to other websites about euro coins that may be of interest. 'Market value' leads to a table showing the market value of each coin in June 2013 ranging from 1300 to 43c, sorted with the most valuable coins first, taken from the (now apparently defunct) euro-coins.tv website. 'Marks' sets out the country codes, mint logos, mint master symbols and artist initials shown on the coins. 'Rarity' leads to a table of how many of each coin was minted, ranging from 1,500 to 1.4 billion, sorted with the rarest coins first. 'Statistics' has some statistical information and other facts about the coins, and 'Totals' simply has the number of coins per year per country.

Finally, 'Variants' leads to a table of recognised coin variants. Variants are coins of the same country, design, year and denomination but with some difference, such as different mint marks on them, or the wrong common (map) side when it changed during 2006-8. Variants do not include one-off error coins where there was a fault in the minting process for a particular coin.

If you have any comments, please email me at eurocollection at outlook.com